Homemade Avocado Oil Mayonnaise Recipe

How to Make Mayonnaise with Avocado Oil & an Immersion Blender

This homemade avocado oil mayo recipe is keto, paleo, and Whole30 compliant—and it tastes better than ANY store-bought mayonnaise I’ve had! Lusciously thick, creamy, and oh-so-easy to prepare. Perfect for spreads, sauces, dressings, sandwiches, tuna salad, or whatever you like! Learn how to make mayonnaise with avocado oil in just 2 minutes using a hand blender.

Homemade Avocado Oil Mayo Recipe

Typically, the first ingredient in store bought mayonnaise is an inflammatory oil, like soybean oil. Even most “olive oil” mayos use a blend of olive, canola, and soybean oils. Plus, many contain sneaky additives like preservatives and food starches. Instead, this avocado oil mayonnaise recipe uses only 5 simple ingredients: avocado oil, an egg, lemon juice, Dijon, and salt!

Although you can find clean avocado mayo options at the store, one 12oz jar can cost over $8. Or, buy a 16-25oz bottle of oil for the same price and make multiple batches of this homemade avocado oil mayo recipe! Mayo is a staple in my house, and we make this recipe just about every week. Grab your immersion blender and I’ll show you how to make mayonnaise with avocado oil in a jiffy.

Homemade avocado oil mayonnaise recipe

Is avocado oil mayonnaise healthy?

“Healthy” is a subjective term, but this recipe is my personal favorite option for homemade mayo. Avocado oil mayonnaise is rich in monounsaturated fats, which are heart-healthy and anti-inflammatory—in contrast to the inflammatory oils used in most mayos. And, avocado oil has a high smoke point, so you can safely use this homemade avocado oil mayo in sauces or marinades for cooking.

Does avocado oil mayo taste different?

To me, homemade avocado oil mayo is just as thick and creamy as any store-bought mayo, and it has the best taste! Honestly, I don’t enjoy the flavor of regular mayo made with soybean oil as much. But, if you’re used to traditional mayonnaise, you may notice a difference in the flavor of this avocado oil mayonnaise. Use a light-colored, refined avocado oil—not extra virgin—for the most neutral flavor.

How to Make Avocado Oil Mayo

Avocado Oil Mayonnaise Recipe Ingredients

  • Avocado Oil. I prefer to make homemade mayonnaise with avocado oil, but I’ve also made this recipe with light olive oil. Or, you can try another refined oil if preferred—just be sure to NOT use an “unrefined” or “extra-virgin” oil.
  • Egg. This is an essential ingredient for any homemade mayo recipe! In my experience, I’ve found that a fresh, whole egg works better than using only egg yolk. For best results, I recommend using a cold egg straight out of the fridge, rather than a room temperature egg.
  • Lemon Juice. This not only adds flavor and freshness, but the citric acid in lemon juice also helps to kill any potential bacteria from the egg. For an alternative acid source, you can substitute with white vinegar, white wine vinegar, or apple cider vinegar.
  • Dijon Mustard. A source of flavor, as well as an emulsifying agent and a natural antimicrobial! That means a bit of Dijon mustard will neutralize bacteria and help your homemade avocado oil mayo to thicken. For a substitute, you could use yellow mustard, although it isn’t as strong of an emulsifier as Dijon.
  • Salt. Just a dash will give your avocado mayo a more savory and satisfying flavor.
How to Make Mayonnaise with Avocado Oil

Which oil is best for mayonnaise?

For a homemade mayonnaise recipe, it’s best to use a refined oil with a neutral flavor. I prefer avocado oil or light olive oil because of their healthy fats. Other options include canola oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, or a blended vegetable oil. However, do NOT use an unrefined oil like extra-virgin olive oil. Unrefined oils have a stronger flavor, and they may cause homemade mayo to separate rather than integrate.

Avocado Mayo vs Olive Oil Mayo

Both avocado oil and olive oil are rich in oleic acid: a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid with anti-inflammatory effects. As long as you use a refined option, you can make mayonnaise with avocado oil or olive oil! I find the olive oil flavor can be a bit overpowering for my taste, but use whichever you prefer. Just be sure to use a refined avocado oil or light/extra light olive oil.

How to make avocado oil mayonnaise

How to Make Avocado Oil Mayo with a Hand Blender

  • Add all ingredients into a tall measuring cup or jar. (It can help to crack the cold egg in first, followed by the other ingredients, then pour the oil in last so it’s on top.)
  • Using an immersion blender, pulse on low speed for a few seconds, gently moving the blender up and down.
  • Once it starts to emulsify and integrate, switch to high speed—pulsing and lifting the blender until the mixture becomes creamy and fluffy. This process takes about 15-30 seconds.
Pulse with a hand blender on low speed.
Gently begin to lift hand blender up and down.
As it starts to emulsify, switch to high speed.
Continue pulsing and lifting the blender up and down, until avocado oil mayo is creamy and fluffy.

What if my homemade mayonnaise breaks?

When learning how to make mayo with avocado oil, I’ve certainly had a few batches that turned out thin and soupy. If your mixture “breaks” and won’t emulsify, you can try to rescue it by adding 1 tsp of Dijon mustard or 1 egg yolk to the mixture. Then, continue pulsing with the hand blender, moving it up and down gently until emulsified and creamy.

Homemade Mayo with Avocado Oil

Why doesn’t my mayonnaise thicken?

If your avocado oil mayonnaise still isn’t thickening after trying the above tips, I recommend starting a new batch with these potential fixes in mind:

  • Use a Refined Oil. Again, refined avocado oil or light olive oil are essential to getting your homemade mayonnaise to thicken and emulsify. Check to make sure that you aren’t using an “unrefined” or “extra-virgin” oil.
  • Make Sure to Use a Cold Egg. Often, homemade avocado oil mayo recipes recommend using a room temperature egg. In my experience, homemade mayonnaise emulsifies best when I use a cold egg straight out of the fridge.
  • Add the Egg First, Oil Last. Some folks find that adjusting the order of ingredients results in a more successful mayo. First, crack a cold egg into the bottom of the jar. Then, without disturbing the egg, add the remaining ingredients—pouring the oil in last so it’s on top. Pulse with the hand blender as usual, gently moving it up and down.
  • Pour Oil in Slowly. If the above tips don’t solve the problem, try a slow-pour method that works for many. Add all ingredients to the container except for the avocado oil. Pulse with the hand blender while you slowly pour in the oil and allow it to combine. This can reduce the chance of breaking the emulsion, allowing your avocado mayo to thicken.

Can I make mayonnaise in a blender?

Personally, I recommend making this avocado oil mayonnaise recipe with a hand / immersion blender. If you don’t have one, then yes—you can try using a regular blender, although there’s a higher risk of the emulsion breaking. Meaning: a potentially soupy mayo. For best results in a regular blender, double the ingredient amounts listed below. (I don’t recommend using a food processor.)

Avocado Mayo

How to Use Avocado Oil Mayonnaise

See how to make avocado oil mayo in my Healthy Lunchables Bento Boxes video!

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Homemade Avocado Oil Mayo Recipe

A homemade avocado oil mayonnaise recipe that’s keto, paleo, and Whole30 compliant—and it tastes better than ANY store-bought mayo I’ve had! How to make mayonnaise with avocado oil using a hand blender.
4.79 stars (23 ratings)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup avocado oil
  • 1 egg, (cold, not room temperature!)
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice, about ½ lemon
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • ¼ tsp salt

Instructions 

  • Add all ingredients into a tall measuring cup or glass jar. (Make sure your egg is cold, not room temperature!)
  • Using an immersion blender, pulse on low speed for a few seconds, gently moving the blender up and down. Once it starts to emulsify and integrate, switch to high speed, continuing to pulse and lift the blender until it becomes creamy and fluffy. This takes about 15-30 seconds in total.
  • If concerned about potential bacteria: Allow homemade mayonnaise to rest at room temperature for 24-72 hours before refrigerating.
  • Enjoy as desired immediately, or store in an airtight container in the fridge for later.
  • Lasts up to 1-2 weeks in the fridge.
  • Yields 1 cup homemade avocado oil mayonnaise.
Serving: 1Tbsp, Calories: 125kcal, Carbohydrates: 0.1g, Protein: 0.4g, Fat: 14g, Sodium: 47mg
Did you make this recipe?Share a photo and tag us @mindovermunch — we can’t wait to see what you’ve made!

How long does homemade mayonnaise last in the fridge?

This homemade avocado oil mayo lasts 1-2 weeks stored in an airtight container in the fridge. Keep in mind, due to the presence of acid, mayonnaise is actually safe at room temperature. And, doing so for the first 24-72 hours helps to kill any potential bacteria. (More below.) However, after that initial period, storing in the fridge will maintain the quality of your homemade mayo for longer.

Why is raw egg in mayonnaise safe?

In this homemade avocado oil mayo recipe, the raw egg is paired with lemon juice (citric acid) and mustard—both of which help to kill any potential bacteria. You can also replace the lemon juice with vinegar, which contains a stronger acid (acetic acid). For added protection, let your avocado oil mayonnaise rest at room temperature for 24-72 hours, giving the acid time to neutralize any bacteria.

Generally, the risk of encountering raw eggs with Salmonella present in them is relatively small. (In the U.S., estimates say around 1 in 20,000 eggs.) If you regularly eat cooked eggs with runny yolks, the risk is similar—even less so if you let the mayo sit at room temperature. For the absolute safest option, use pasteurized eggs (particularly if making homamde mayo for children, elderly, pregnant people, or a large crowd).